Cord Making

So last post I mentioned that there would be a post forth coming regarding the physical process of making cord in the two methods that I know.

Method One (by virtue of me learning it first): Lucet

A lucet is a fork looking tool with two tines, it generally looks like a wooden tuning fork. But they can be made out of wood, bone, horn, plastic, ect. Basically anything rigid. They also don’t have to be fork shaped. This is mine:

lucet

This is going to be picture heavy because trying to explain how this works is… well… words are hard yo.

Step one: Make a slip knot and loop it over one of your tines (or dragon legs as the case may be) BUT DO NOT PULL IT TIGHT. That’s important.

lucet-step1

Step 2: Flip your lucet counterclockwise a full turn. Why counterclockwise? Because that’s how I do it and you always need to flip in the same direction or else you won’t be able to tighten the knot you’re making down enough to make cord. You should now have your slip knot, a loop of yarn around the other leg, and a loop around the leg the slip knot is on. Like this:

lucet-step2

Step 3: Carefully pull your slip knot up over the loop of yarn above it and off the leg entirely.

lucet-step3

Step 4: Now you can pull the tail of your slip knot and tighten it down. That’ll form your first chain/cord/link thing.

lucet-step4

Step 5: Turn your lucet counter clockwise half a turn so that you have a new loop of yarn on the opposite leg.

lucset-step5

Step 6: Pull the bottom loop over the top loop and off the leg.

lucet-step6

Step 7: Wiggle the existing cord back and forth to tighten down the loop  you just de-legged.

lucet-step7

Repeat steps 5-7 as many times as you need to get the length of cord you want OR until you run out of yarn. This is the simpliest cord pattern you can do for a lucet. If you use google you’ll find all kinds of other patterns and ways of doing it. I like this one because it’s easy and gives a nice, sturdy, square cord.

img_20161010_124451106

Method Two: Weird double loopy thing I never learned the proper name for AKA Why-Aethelflied-can’t-name-things

This method uses two strands (I’m using contrasting colors for you to see clearly because I’m nice like that) but no other tools.

Step 1: Make a slip knot in each of your two threads. Slide one over the pointer finger of your left hand. Why left? Because that’s how I start.

loop1

Step 2: Take the index finger of your other hand and slide it through the loop in the same direction as the finger on hand one.

loop2

Step 3: Loop the second thread over finger 2

loop3

Step 4: Pull finger 2 and thread two through loop 1

loop4

Step 5: Tighten loop 1 around thread 2.

Finger and thread 2 now become finger and thread 1. Repeat steps 2-5 until cord is as long as you want or you run out of yarn. This method (very quickly) produces a nice round cord.

loop6

Pros and Cons:

Method 1 is easier to pick up and put down for long periods of time. And (since it only uses one strand) you don’t have to measure out your materials exactly. It also gives you multiple patterns, as opposed to method 2 where you’re limited to creating pattern by switching up your yarns. That being said I prefer method 2. I find it faster and easier and gentler on my hands.

 

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